Apps

 

To begin with we recommend that you install the following apps (or similar):

 

Required

 

  • Atlas/Google Earth
  • Book creator (must be fully functional) or Creative Book Builder
  • Calculator
  • Explain Everything*
  • Google Classroom
  • Google Drive
  • Google Docs
  • Google Sheets
  • Google Slides
  • iMovie
  • Dictionary
  • Garageband or Auxy
  • Keynote
  • Popplet*
  • Puppetpals
  • QR Creator and QR Reader
  • iMotion

 Note: iMovie, Pages, Garageband and Keynote come free with the purchase of recent iPads.

Additional free apps will be installed via Airwatch.

Suggested (not essential, but recommended)

  • Battletimes HD or similar
  • Bible app with NRSV version*
  • Comic life*
  • PS Touch (optional)*
  • Weather app
  • Telligami*
  • Dragon Box (algebra)* (Yr6)
  • Dragon Box (elements)*  (Yr6)

*paid app

 

These apps are recognised as purposeful and engaging. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list. Students may install other apps that suit their needs under the supervision of their parents. All personal apps not used at school should be on the back pages of the home screen – school policy.

Chris Betcher (2013 ICT Educator of the Year) elaborates on this idea in his blog:

We initially asked the students to have only a fairly small set of designated core productivity apps installed on their iPads – a web browser, word processor, presentation tool, PDF/eBook reader, video and audio editing tools, etc. We have intentionally not made long lists of “required apps” because the nature of operating a BYOD program is such that students should be allowed to choose the tools (in the form of apps) that work best for them. For example, in a recent task, students had an option to produce a set of presentation slides (what in a non-iPad world you’d just refer to as a “PowerPoint”) The task was structured in such a way that students could respond to this task using a variety of presentation-style apps, including Keynote, MoveNote, PopBoardz, Haiku Deck, SlideIdea, Flowboard, and others. Part of the learning we want to occur is that students are given opportunities to make good decisions about which technology tools they wish to use, and allow them to identify, find and manage those apps. In finding new apps they also develop the very important skill of learning how to use a piece of software that they have never seen before. What this amounts to is a way of helping students “learn how to learn”, which is possibly the most important skill they can take away from the whole experience of school. (chrisbetcher.com)